El Cocuy – The Town

The town of El Cocuy is where we prepped for our visit to El Cocuy National Park.  There is more to this town than first meets the eye.  When we first showed up, our main focus was checking in at the hotel, getting secure parking sorted out, and walking for more than 5 minutes without being out of breath.  We were essentially arriving from being at sea level (we were at the coast two days earlier), and El Cocuy is situated at 9,000 feet, which became painfully obvious when everything we did resulted in being out of breath.

Before you can enter the national park, you must first pay the entrance fee ($52,000 pesos per person).  In order to pay the entrance fee you must first obtain rescue insurance (approximately $7,000 pesos per day per person).  We were outfitted with brightly coloured wristbands (think all-inclusive resort, but without the sun, beaches, alcohol, or pools) containing our insurance policy number in case we got lost or tumbled off the mountainside.  Safety first!  Our moms were much happier knowing that we’d be easy to ID if anybody found us.  After the safety meeting we stocked up on fresh produce from the local market, located across the street from the National Park Office.  They had some of the best produce we’ve seen in Colombia so far, and the people were some of the friendliest you can meet.

At first we found it difficult to find food in El Cocuy, but hit the jackpot after a few rounds. You can purchase teeny coffees at most of the convenience stores or bakeries around town. We picked up our daily dose of café tinto sin azucar (black coffee without sugar) at many of these spots.  Eventually we also found a lady making empanadas, hot dogs, pizza, and papas rellenos (stuffed deep-fried potato concoction from heaven) near the main square.  This spot was quite busy during the halftime Copa America futbal break, with locals hand-bombing the delicious deep fried treats.  One of the best lunches we had was off the main street, where we had rotisserie chicken, boiled potatoes, and salsa.  It was so good that we picked up an extra chicken for our time in the park.

desktoglory_elcocuy-1 copydesktoglory_elcocuy-4 copyThe view from our hotel (Posada Del Molino) had us itching to get deeper into the mountains.  They have secure parking here for anything that will fit in a shipping container.  desktoglory_elcocuy-6 copy

Trailhead/Camping Spot #1:  Cabanas Kanwara

The following morning we headed to our next destination, and first camping spot in the park, Cabanas Kanwara. Here we spent the better part of a day prepping food for the upcoming days and getting acclimatized to the elevation gain.

The owner, Hernando, at Cabanas Kanwara is super friendly and speaks clear Spanish very slowly.  It was a treat to be able to understand Spanish again after being confused by the rapid coastal Spanish we encountered upon arriving in Colombia . This campsite was probably one of our favourites of the trip so far, complete with rainbows, snowy mountain peaks popping out from behind the clouds, and countryside all around.  I’m not going to lie, we were still in our acclimatization period at this point so we were feeling less than fabulous, but the scenery sure helped improve our mood!

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Hike 1:  Laguna Grande de los Verdes

We drove to the “trailhead,” which we discovered was really just the end of the road past the Cabanas Kanwara.  The hike took around 5 hours to get to a point where we had a good view of the lake.

An hour or so into the hike we came upon an icy cold river where there was no choice but to strip off our hiking boots and wade across.  As I splashed my way across the rock-filled water with my boots tied to my backpack,  I arrived at the other side with numb red feet and suddenly burst into tears.  What the heck!?  Something about the glacier-cold water had triggered some kind of emotional floodgate that took about ten minutes to get out!  Richard rubbed my feet and I sipped on some hot chocolate we had in a thermos before lacing back up and continuing on with our hike.  Luckily we made it across on the way back without any meltdowns.

We saw hundreds of sheep, a couple of ranchers riding their horses, and epic green valleys.  What we didn’t see on this hike were tourists.  Back home in the Pacific Northwest we would have run into about 5000 people on a similar trail so it was a treat to soak up the views without anybody else around.

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Hike 2:  Ritacuba Blanco

The trailhead starts very close to the Cabanas Kanwara (just across the road).  This was our favourite hike in the park.  It took us almost 7 hours to get to the snowline of Ritacuba Blanco (16,000ft) and back.  We utilized every piece of clothing during this hike.  We started off sweating in the sun and stripping our layers.  By the time we made it to the top we were fully bundled up due to wind and snow.

desktoglory_elcocuy-24 desktoglory_elcocuy-25 desktoglory_elcocuy-26 desktoglory_elcocuy-27 desktoglory_elcocuy-28By this time we had made it very close to the top, but the wind and snow were tiring us out a bit.  Here Richard takes a quick rest.  Maybe his mountain man “beard” was weighing him down too much.desktoglory_elcocuy-29 copyRested and ready to continue to the snowline!  It looks like someone rallied for a selfie!desktoglory_elcocuy-30Check out the enthusiasm for making it to the top!desktoglory_elcocuy-32 copydesktoglory_ritacuba-2desktoglory_ritacuba-1 desktoglory_elcocuy-34 desktoglory_elcocuy-36 desktoglory_elcocuy-37

Trailhead/Camping Spot #2:  Hacienda La Esperanza

After two days of fairly intense hiking, we drove our wind-burnt faces to the lovely spot at Hacienda La Esperanza for a much needed rest day.  Here we met Guillermo.  He fed us three great meals, shared his experiences away from the hacienda, and gave us plenty of tips for our next hike in El Cocuy.  You can see him hanging out the window in the photo below.

desktoglory_elcocuy-47desktoglory_elcocuy-46 copydesktoglory_elcocuy-41 desktoglory_elcocuy-42 copy desktoglory_elcocuy-43 copydesktoglory_elcocuy-48 desktoglory_elcocuy-49Guillermo’s father hooked us up with some sweet hats and ponchos for a photo-op.  Legit!desktoglory_elcocuy-39 copyThe Hacienda also marks the trailhead for the Laguna Grande de la Sierra hike.  We did not attempt this hike but it is very popular.  We did go on about a 30 minute walk through the countryside nearby, which was quite beautiful.  Again, nobody out here except us and a handful of sheep.desktoglory_elcocuy-55 desktoglory_elcocuy-56 copy desktoglory_elcocuy-58 desktoglory_elcocuy-60 copydesktoglory_elcocuy-38

Trailhead/Camping Spot #3:  Cabanas Herrera

We learned pretty quickly that you can’t actually drive to Cabanas Sisuma. This was the original plan until the cliff-lined road was blocked by a giant boulder right before it narrowed into a walking path. Our GPS is usually pretty good, but sometimes it has an optimistic idea of what is considered a road.  We reversed the truck and made our way back to Cabanas Herrera.

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Hike 3:  Pan de Azucar/El Pulpito del Diablo

Cabanas Herrera would be our new trailhead for hiking Pan de Azucar.  What we really wanted to see was El Pulpito del Diablo.  The prominent rock formation can be seen from Ritacuba Blanco and we wanted a closer look.

Spoiler alert, unfortunately we couldn’t make it to the top.  The howling wind trying to blow us off the mountain combined with the clouds rolling in quickly made the decision for us to high-tail it back to camp.  There are a couple of steep scrambles and we wanted to get down those before the clouds/fog inhibited our sight of the trail.  There was a huge military presence on this side of the mountain since a guide had recently gone missing.  We decided that was a good sign to play it safe and head back to camp early.

The hike took us 8 hours round-trip.  We expect that in good weather it still would have been at least another 30-60 minutes to make it to the top.  The walk from Cabanas Herrera was an hour and fifteen minutes one-way to the trailhead, so in theory you could also park your vehicle at Cabanas Herrera, walk to Cabanas Sisuma and stay there overnight, and start the trek from the trailhead.  This would have been the smarter move to make it to the top before the afternoon clouds set in.

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All in all, El Cocuy met and exceeded our expectations.  We didn’t get altitude sickness and we didn’t have to use our mountain rescue insurance.  What did happen was that we were able to see epic peaks and completely different landscapes on each of the hikes we did.  To us, this magical place contained some of the most beautiful scenery we’ve ever encountered, some of the toughest hikes, and the most challenging weather.  It left us wanting more, and you can’t ask for much more than that.

We used the PNN El Cocuy website to plan our hikes.  This website gives a good description of the various camping spots and their proximity to the trailheads.

Map:  Hiking El Cocuy National Park

  • Driving route
  • Hikes
  • Camping/Cabanas

El Cocuy Map

13 comments

  • Rich

    With every post and picture, you both are helping to generate a desire to explore and experience the land and people around us!
    Very well done!

    Reply
  • Rhonda

    Looks fantastic.. and NO PEOPLE… wow.. certainly different than anywhere in Oregon/ PNW, as you know! Do they allow dogs on the trails in the national parks in Ecuador? I know it can be an issue down in Chile.

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      Hi Rhonda! I really don’t know if they allow dogs or not. Toby and Chloe from Carpe Viam did go the park with their small dog, but not sure about the details…

      Thanks!
      Richard

      Reply
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  • Ralph

    Hey was the Laguna de la Plaza open to hiking when you were there? I here it was closed to visitors in 2013.

    Cheers

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      Hi Ralph! That is a good question, I’m not sure if it was open or not. From the search I just did it looks like it is probably still closed. I googled it though and the photos look beautiful!

      Reply
  • Palmanova

    Hi so you were there in August? I am planing to go there in November, do you know how long can you stay in park, because I will walk so I will need more time to see all the nice places 🙂

    Reply
    • Nate

      Palmanova, did you make it to Cocuy? We’re planning on going there mid December. We’re driving from Santa Marta. Any news of road, or trail conditions?

      Thanks!

      Nate

      Reply
  • JacelDeGuzman

    Hi Rich & Ash,

    First I would like to thank you for the effort of these detailed informations you have on your blog. Most of the informations on the web are outdated and yours is the newest and has more detailed info. It really help us a lot as we are planning to trek in the park on March.

    I have a couple of questions though if you don’t mind. Me adn my friend is trying to get to Pan De Azucar and Pulpito del Diablo and we would like to know where we should begin our trek. We are already aware that we should take the milktrucks to get to the park but we don’t know where to get off nearest to that location.
    We only have 2whole days to stay inside the park.

    Last question is the transportation back to El Cocuy town, do you have any idea if there are milktrucks that goes back to town in the afternoon? Thank you for your help. 🙂

    Reply
  • Andrea

    Thank you SO much for this post! We are headed for Colombia (from Vancouver, Canada!) in 3 days and El Cocuy will be one of our first stops.

    We are leaning towards renting a car vs busing. I’m going to read the rest of your site now for any insights on that!

    Reply
  • favian

    Your blog gave me a better understanding what awaits me next week. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Kristin

    Hi Wast the park closed when you arrived? I heard a rumour that it is currently closed for the 6 day circuit, but curious if you can still do day trips from the Cabanas. If anyone has info that would be very much appreciated.

    Reply
  • Nate

    Ridiculous scenery.

    Reply

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