Let us start off by saying that we are mere visitors to these wonderful Latin American countries.  We can’t comment on political issues, poverty, and the way of life of the millions of people we didn’t meet.  We are merely describing our great three week experience in a country that we knew almost nothing about before we crossed the border…  – Richard and Ashley

With a reputation of being the murder capital of the world who wouldn’t want to go to Honduras?  During our volunteer prep back home in Vancouver we had the choice between Guatemala and Honduras, and chose Honduras.  We knew that due to its reputation it may have less volunteers and our impact could be more far reaching.  Plus we wanted to give this misunderstood country of Central America a chance and scope it out for ourselves.

We heard the bad press before we left on our trip.  But then again we heard bad press about almost every Latin American country we had made through safely.  The one difference were all of the stories about the corrupt  police in Honduras.  We made sure that we had our necessary warning triangles, fire extinguisher, and all paperwork handy in case we got pulled over.  Prepared and vigilant.

Well, after two weeks in the country we were pulled over handful of times while going through police checkpoints.  Every single one of these started with a smile and a handshake.  Sometimes they asked for paperwork, but every time they just waived us on and told us to have a good day.  Riiiighht.  That’s what all the fuss is about?  Maybe they’re just doing their job, or maybe it was Richard’s sweet technique of bombarding them with bad Spanish.  Try it, it works!

Hola!  Como tiamo?  Soy Ricardo.  Mucho gusto!  Soy de Canada!  Nosotros manejamos aqui de Canada!  Vente mille kilometers!  Mi gusta acampar!”

Oh yeah, we didn’t get attacked by any drug cartel either.  Bonus!

Okay, so if we didn’t get bribed by cops or attacked by drug dealers, then what did we do in Honduras?  First things first was a stop to the ruins of Copan.  After 8 hours on the road we stopped at Jim’s Pizza for a margherita pizza and some beer.  So far so good, Honduras.  The next day we fueled ourselves up with local coffee and bagels and lox.  Not necessarily having a hard time finding great food in this country.

Really, Copan was just a good place to stop after crossing the border from El Salvador, but we thought it was worth a walk through the ruins while we were in town.  In all honesty, after seeing Tikal, Teotihuacan, and Palenque these were pretty underwhelming compared to the sheer size of the other ruins.  The saving grace was that there were only a handful of other tourists and the park was muy tranquillo.  Our recommendation is to bring a picnic lunch and hang out for a couple of hours.

Our next week was spent in El Porvenir, but you read about that in the last blog post… didn’t you?

After volunteering we needed to make one more stop before the run to the Nicaraguan border.  We set up camp at D&D Brewery on Lago Yojoa.  Once again, the food was great… we started our mornings with blueberry pancakes and local coffee ($4).  Then we rented a rowboat for the day ($2.50) and worked out our shoulders and backs while working on some sweet hand calluses.  Hardcore.  Also we enjoyed the serenity on the lake.

And then the cops came to our campsite.  Here we go, they want a bribe for sure and we weren’t even driving anywhere.  Our conversation was in Spanish, but here’s the English version:

Police:  “Do you want to take a photo with us?” 

Richard:  “Umm… Pardon?”

Police:  “Do you want to take a photo?”

Richard:  “Okay, can I sit on your bike?”

Police:  “No problem, we can turn the lights on too!”

Alright Honduras, you win this one.  Nicaragua is next!

 

Jim’s Pizza in Copan is worth the drive140411_D2G_Honduras-1Bagles and lox at the San Rafael Cafe in Copan140411_D2G_Honduras-2 140411_D2G_Honduras-3 140411_D2G_Honduras-4 140411_D2G_Honduras-5Part of the park in Copan is used to rehabilitate these macaws140411_D2G_Honduras-6 140411_D2G_Honduras-7The Copan ruins are said to have some of the more preserved statues140411_D2G_Honduras-8 140411_D2G_Honduras-9 140411_D2G_Honduras-10 140411_D2G_Honduras-11 140411_D2G_Honduras-12 140411_D2G_Honduras-13 140411_D2G_Honduras-14 140411_D2G_Honduras-15 140411_D2G_Honduras-16We stopped for photos in the palm trees on our way to El Porvenir140411_D2G_Honduras-19 140411_D2G_Honduras-20Main Street, El Porvenir140411_D2G_Honduras-21Maura’s was our go-to place for lunch in El Porvenir.  This is a $2.50 plate of fried fish, plantains, beans and rice, salad, and pickled onions140411_D2G_Honduras-22

We took a hike into the Pico Bonito Reserve which is only a few kilometres away from El Porvenir140411_D2G_Honduras-23Pico Bonito has a few waterfalls…140411_D2G_Honduras-24And a few derelict bridges… we didn’t see any animals, but apparently you’ve got to be in the park by 7am to see anything interesting.  Too bad we didn’t know about that BEFORE we went on our hike.  140411_D2G_Honduras-25On our (roundabout) way to the border we stopped at D&D Brewery for camping, beer, and great food140411_D2G_Honduras-35140411_D2G_Honduras-36140411_D2G_Honduras-34The blueberry pancakes at D&D Brewery complete with fresh local coffee…. mmmmm140411_D2G_Honduras-26We decided to take a romantic boat ride for two.  We picked up the oars nearby the brewery ($2.50 for the day) and made our way down to the river to pick a boat!140411_D2G_Honduras-27 140411_D2G_Honduras-28 140411_D2G_Honduras-29 140411_D2G_Honduras-30 140411_D2G_Honduras-31And this is when the cops came… and wanted to take photos with us!140411_D2G_Honduras-32 140411_D2G_Honduras-33

Interested in going to Honduras?  Grab a Lonely Planet through our Amazon affiliate link!  If you click on this we get a small percentage of Amazon’s profit!  The price to you always remains the same though! 

73 comments

  • Rhonda

    Love it…. we’ll definitely be hitting Honduras on our way through too. Sad to me that even those willing to brave the open road through Central America, believe all the bad press.

    Reply
  • Emma

    Yay Honduras! That D&D Brewery has been on our list of places we want to visit for a while. When people say ‘do you want to order a latte’ my usual response is ‘No thanks, I can camp outside a Brewery in Honduras for that price’. True story. Beer always wins over coffee in my books. 😀 (Although those blueberry pancakes also look seriously tempting).

    Reply
  • Víctor Lee

    Pizza and “Salva Vida” beer!, that is great!

    Reply
  • Gustavo Casulá

    Sorry to read that in Canada and perhaps elsewhere circulate such bad news about my country Honduras, we are a country of peaceful people and are visited by many tourists from around the world, a few weeks ago I met a couple from Slovakia in the city of Gracias in the Department of Lempira in the West of my country and so you can find tourists from many parts of the world. It is true we have problems but our authorities are resolving them to make my country a tourist destination for many people who think traveling to Central America especially Honduras my country, many sensationalist media outlets have hurt us publishing for decades only negative things, but when tourists who visit us they are surprised that here is peace, friendliness and service of my fellow citizens. Please publish the goodness of my country whenever you visit us for the world to know that not everything that is said about Honduras is true, we have much to offer and we hope you keep visiting my country. Our embassies and consulates in your countries must have many tourist alternatives of all kinds, please visit us and support us to change the view so wrong about my country; you will always be welcome and cared for with all cordiality.
    By the way beautiful pictures I will copy and share them with friends Thanks

    Reply
    • Michael

      Gustavo, I agree with your sentiments here. I have lived in Honduras and visited twice since ’90. The people that speak of bad things put themselves in bad situations. I have nothing but great memories of everything I’ve done and everybody I’ve met. I love Honduras with as much of my heart as my home country Canada. I will be back to Honduras in the next couple of years. I have introduced my wife to your beautiful country and hope to do the same with our kids. Saludos!

      Reply
  • Nicole

    Thank you for the love! Honduras is a beautiful place with warm people, wonderful sights & delicious eats. Made me miss it even more with that pic of the fried fish—-my favorite!!!!! xo, A Honduran living in Houston

    Reply
    • Erick

      Say hi to Allan and Lourdes for me please Nicole.

      Michael it is true, we Hondurans are not violent. We welcome all foreigners with open arms and no prejudice. Just like anywhere else on the planet there are criminals and crooks, but that does not define us as a nation, as people.

      I am happy you and your wife like several thousand other foreigners find our country and our people lovely, peacefull and beautiful!!

      Welcome whenever you visit again!!

      Reply
  • Juan Carlos Degrandez

    Thanks for talk good things about my country, HONDURAS IS GREAT !

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      We had a blast in Honduras. The locals were some of the nicest people we have ever met!

      Reply
  • Inti

    I am glad you enjoyed my lovely country. It has many great things, like you express in your post. However, how long were you there for? A couple weeks? Also, are you white/caucasian? Time and skin color make a difference on how you are treated and perceive this treatment. All the stuff you read in the news about Honduras is true, so please don’t try to cover the thousands of deaths every year by fantasizing about a tropical paradise that only exists in Hollywood movies. It’s called privilege, and you should know better than wanting to overlook a complete societal and governmental mess that is Honduras just because you were treated differently due to your country of origin and skin color.

    Reply
    • hannah

      You took the words right out of my mouth! I’m not Honduran myself, just married to one. We lived there for 5 years, and it’s a beautiful place with a lot of potential, but is still mostly a mess like you say!

      Reply
      • Rossana

        I am Honduran myself, and unlike you two I was born and raised in Honduras and continue to live there. I am not Caucasian and I have had the same experience in my wonderful country that they did. lnstead of complaining, and blaiming “white priviledge” – stay quiet. If you don’t like my country, do not call it your own. If you don’t live there anymore, do not state an opinion about it’s current situation. Instead of complaining so much, go do something productive in your new home, away from Honduras. That pessimistic, blame-it-on-the-world attitude is exactly what my country does not need.

        Reply
        • Dinorah

          Well I am Caucasian and I have lived here in Honduras since I was 2. I love my country, cause I feel more Honduran than anything else. I have never experienced the so called privileges just cause I’m white and blonde. I have enjoyed all sorts of activities here, even getting robbed…wasn’t too bad. Hahahahaha. I mean bad stuff happens everywhere! Nevertheless I am married to a Honduran and even though shit happens here everyday, we can also appreciate all the amazing things my country offers. I can tell you I LOVE HONDURAS! The real problem is that ppl are negative and all they do is express the bad and ugly stuff that happens. Thank you Richard, and Ashley for giving my country an opportunity not all is terrible here. Hope to see you back soon.

          Reply
    • Oral

      Hey excuse me but how can u call your self Honduran if this pepole were treated that way is not because of there skin color or there country origin i am a Honduran i live on spain and you can bet that i miss my country you dont have a clue on how valuble are we you are just blind we have our problems ass usa has and even spain but dont you ever tell me that Hondurans are not polite with everyone we are not all the same the gangs or cartels are located on honduras because is a logical place to install it is just in the middle of the americas Roatan has registrated only 2 murders last years 3 suicides and the other dead are accidents now lady or man whatever u are lets just pretend that u did not talk bad about my country

      Reply
    • GracielaRodriguez

      Inti. I just reply directly to your response. When I visit Honduras, Me, dark skin an all, and a woman from San Pedro Sula on top of that, I stayed for over a month. Travel on a regular basis since 1971. Yes, you will not do stupid things that you will NOT do in New York City, or Los Angeles, and God forbid, in the middle of Hollywood, where I have also lived for many years. You use your common sense and stay safe. But enjoy the beauty and friendliness that Honduras has always been and will continue to be for years to come. Just in 2014 I was in Honduras 3 separate trips. Taking the local bus, the ferry, walking from the hotel to relatives homes in La Ceiba. Going to mass in downtown San Pedro Sula with my mother, who still lives in downtown San Pedro Sula at the age of 87! And goes for coffee with her lady friends after mass. This is bravely living without fear.

      Reply
  • danilo levi

    next time, try the local food. you’ll really get a taste for the country. Lox and bagels and pancakes are for tourists.

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      Don’t worry danilo. We love the local food and obviously eat it 99% of the time! After being on the road for half a year we liked having a taste of home though. 🙂

      Reply
  • B

    Hello. I am Honduran American and lived in Honduras for a while growing up…and I completely agree with Inti. Honduras is a beautiful county and I miss it everyday. The people are extremely kind and generous and yes, there is a lot of negative media out there, and just like everything…we should be skeptical about what we read.

    As I said before…I agree with Inti. If you actually lived in Honduras, you would understand the fear people live with everyday. I am speaking from my experience, not as a tourist. That is why I have a problem with the white Americans/Canadians coming to Latin American countries as “the white savior”, as if we needed you white people to come in and help us because we aren´t “capable” of doing so. In the end, you coming to our “exotic” country to “help” us only benefits you in the end. Since you mention that you are Canadian, I am assuming you are white. White people are seen differently in Honduras. Do not downplay the horrors that people face everyday. You did not face them because of your skin color and the privilege that you have being Canadian. You don´t have to wake up everyday fearing that you will not have anything to eat that day. Maybe you did not encounter corrupt cops, but I can assure you that just because you didn´t encounter them, it doesn´t mean that they don´t exist. Let me tell you that it was cops who killed the son of the President of the Universidad Autonoma in Tegucigalpa.

    There is a problem in Honduras and people fear their lives everyday. After your lovely visit, all the Honduras you met have to go back to their lives to live in poverty in a way that you would never even imagine living. So yes, I am insulted at how you downplay the fact that Honduras is in crisis just so that you can have your little vacation and go back to your privileged life.

    Reply
    • Curly

      Wow B, what graceful tact you use to win people’s hearts and minds!
      “as if we needed you white people to come in and help us because we aren´t “capable” of doing so.”
      that sounds a bit condescending. listen, they are volunteering, which is to say they are doing more for your people than you likely are – tell us what you’ve done to help out el pueblo lately.
      you say you are insulted, yet you are very insulting yourself in your tone.
      you can either choose to continue your current attitude or make the decision to do something positive for a change.

      Reply
    • GracielaRodriguez

      B. You should be grateful for the BRAVE Canadian couple that against all Good Advice like yours visited Honduras, and survived, all of the HORRORS, had a great experience to share for others to try and visit Honduras. You sound as someone who have never encounter nor experiences the poverty of any big USA city, or the South of USA, or knows nothing about the Appalachia region. In comparison, Honduras is rich!!

      Reply
    • Dof

      As a honduran I do not approve this message. Actually I am a bit embarrased by it. I am honduran. Ive lived here for 31yrs(thats.y age

      Reply
      • Dof

        Sorry.. Thats my age..
        There are a lot of bad things.. Yet we ahould be thankful they came.. And they are promoting the country on thei website. So more people can come.. Volunteer and spend a few dollars so local restaurants and hard working people can keep their businessess alive.

        Reply
    • Rossana

      You don’t live there anymore, and you are referencing outdated news -2012 to be precise. “I lived there some time growing up” and then left? . While you left, I am still there – even though I have every opportunity to leave. If you have nothing nice to say about the country that has nurtured me throughout my whole life, as opposed to “some time”, stay silent. And stay away – we are working hard to make our country better, while people like you just love to voice their uninformed opinion and downgrade our efforts with bad press. It is truly MY country, not yours.

      Reply
  • Gabriel

    Thanks for tell your history about Honduras; is a great country, with so many beautiful places to visit. You must visit Bay´s Islands (specially Roatán). It´s true that´s is a dangerous country, like Guatemala, El Salvador, Colombia, Mexico, etc. You have to take precautions, and get a good plan before coming. If you do it, you don´t have to worry at all. Blessings!

    Reply
  • Marie

    I completely agree with you! Thanks for writing this post. Honduras is such a BEAUTIFUL country and the people are seriously some of the nicest I have ever met!

    Reply
  • Rossy

    As a Honduran I would like to say THANKS, media is cruel to stick to bad press, next time you should go to Roatan, Tela o Trujillo, Talgua caves and spend a night under the star (mind the mosquitoes) but Honduras is a nice place to live. Thank you for your beautiful review, you are welcome to come back.

    Reply
  • Beth Carleo

    I was just in Honduras back in June for the 3rd time. I don’t know what it is, but there is something so lovable about the Honduran people. We’ve never encountered problems with the police. Even when we were in the mountains and a group of soldiers passed by, they didn’t threaten or intimidate us. They were curious to know what we were up to and we ended up talking to them for like 10 minutes. I was a bit taken aback when you called it “the black sheep of Central America” because I never sensed that in the least while I was there. I have always left that country with a full heart, because the people are so great. I would definitely recommend Hondy as a visiting place! Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      Hi Beth! The only reason we called it “the black sheep of Central America” was due to many of the overland travellers who choose to skip by the country (cross from El Salvador to Nica in one day) for one reason or another. Didn’t mean anything beyond that 🙂 Glad you enjoyed it as much as we did!

      Reply
  • Andrés

    Thanks for the visit and the positive review. The places you visited are only part of the beautiful and natural places to visit here in Honduras. We are sad to hear that bad press has scared people away, I won’t lie and say that there is no violence and corruption, but there are many more good people here than bad. Local tourism is something I love to do and it is there, deep in the small towns, the gorgeous scenery and “virgin” places that you will find the charisma, love and humble people that make this country great.

    We hope to receive many more visitors such as yourselves in order to spread the word that Honduras is beautiful, that Central America is beautiful and that Latin America is beautiful.

    Reply
  • Eduardo Medina

    You should definitely come back and try UTILA!

    Reply
  • Neidi

    Im Honduran and I like this article, but with the only thing I didn’t agree was with you saying: “these were pretty mediocre”, sincerely in my personal opinion Copan Ruins is a very pretty place!! But I really love that you like that much Honduras and that you will give a very good image for all people, Hope you come back!!

    Reply
  • Samantha

    I’m so glad people are choosing to spend time in Honduras! I’m an American who lived there for two years and absolutely loved it. The places you went are great and there are so many more beautiful spots that are great for tourists as well. Thanks for spreading the word!

    Reply
  • Jessica

    B & Inti, obviously Honduras has its problems and they arent trying to mask that. I think what is great that they did was just put out that they still were able to enjoy the many beautiful aspects of Honduras and to encourage people to also check it out despite the media. It has nothing to do with privilege or being white. I am white and lived in Honduras for 5 years. I also lived in Olancho, probably the most dangerous part of Honduras and I am married to a Honduran. I recognize Honduras’s problems and it’s beauty. And there are plenty people living in the US & Canada that have the same fears as some Hondurans. So you’re rude to comment negatively on this post. No one said Honduras didn’t have its problems. They just talk about how DESPITE the problems, it’s worth visiting and seeing it’s beauty and meeting the amazing people. So I thank you both for your post and am glad you enjoyed your trip!

    Reply
    • Inti

      How about you re-read the article? You got the message wrong.

      By the way, I’m appalled by your conclusion that “[i]t has nothing to do with privilege or being white.” Didn’t you learn in those five years how, on average, you were better treated and appreciated than most Hondurans?

      Reply
      • GracielaRodriguez

        Inti are you the kind of. Individual (are you a woman or man) that hides behind the “race” thing to “color” your point of view in life? Being white or dark skin is a poor excuse to live the life you choose to fully experience.

        Reply
  • Ana

    I really enjoyed your article and the fact that you spent time in a place that many people don’t go to. I don’t agree with some of the comments although I do respect them. I’m glad because you experienced our country and travelled the road and had a wonderful time. I’m not priveleged as some of the comment say and I’m not afraid to leave my house. I have to work and many times travel out of town for it, you just have to take precautions. I thank you for your volunteer work because it often takes people from other countries to help communities that other wise wouldn’t have water and electricity for example. I will not be bitter but grateful of the work many volunteers do coming to a place that has bad press even though when they are here they realize that it wasn’t all they way it has said it is.

    Reply
  • Steve Malone

    I not only visited Honduras Honduras over 35 times in the past 11 years, but we run a small charity called Healthy Horizons For Children and Families based out Ontario Canada. The people of Honduras are some of the most gentle people I know and are always welcoming. The country is not without its problems and dangers, but it is also full of peaceful areas, kind and loving people. Yes one must be careful while traveling in the larger cities, but the same can be said about other large cities in any countries! Staying off the road after dark will also make sense and traveling in groups is also a safe way to see the beautiful country! Steve http://www.hhcf.ca

    Reply
  • Franco Rivera

    i want to express my self in spanish.
    Gracias, por su Blog. ayer regrese de la Bahía de Tela, pasamos un tiempo formidable con mi familia, pasando por el Progreso y el Lago de Yojoa, comimos delicioso y disfrutamos de un paisaje maravilloso. las noticias y la prensa nos llena de malas noticias, y nos presentan un panorama oscuro y sin futuro, sus palabras y fotografías muestran todo lo contrario y eso es lo que debemos resaltar. Honduras es hermoso y es verdad somos cálidos y siempre tenemos una sincera sonrisa en nuestras caras. Bienvenidos a este hermoso país!!!

    Reply
  • E. Cristina Hernandez

    This article makes me so proud to be Honduran. You describe perfectly how Hondurans are, we are friendly, loving connected people and great hosts to visitors. We are labelled the murder capital of the world, yet I challenge any one to come and visit and not leave absolutely in love with our land, our people, and our way of life. Yes, our country is under a major crisis, crime rate is high, poverty abounds. However, this is exactly why we cannot turn our backs on this nation, this is exactly why having foreigners visit and leave the country speaking lovingly of their experience allow us to heal as a nation and to seek a better way of life. Crime does not ignore and skip over the ‘privileged’. Locals and foreigners alike can loose their lives in Honduras, but the same thing can happen in the US and anywhere else. And what I see is 2 people who dared to come and experience themselves what Honduras is like and were able to connect to people, to see it’s beauty and leave the country having had a great experience. Thank you for taking the time to express and share your experience online so we can all partake in your wonderful Honduras journey.

    Reply
  • Ana Madrid

    Great! its a pitty we hear more love from tourists than from our own people. HONDURAS is great and it sure has some bad things like everywhere else, but the good things are much more, we just need to open our eyes and appreciate them. Thank you for this lovely post and pictures.

    Reply
  • Lana White

    Think of Honduras as three different countries:
    There’s the country that is about the government, the country governed by the people, and the country governed by…everything illegal going here.

    Depending on what you want to see, and where you want to live, you will meet either three of these alter-egos of the country. Try meeting the country governed by the people. That’s the loveliest place in the planet. You will be treated with kindness and respect, regardless of your skin colour or anything else someone else pointed out. Honduras is populated by hard-working, honest people, and unfortunately, some crooks have been trying for years to impose ‘leadership’ on us, but it doesn’t change who we are at core.

    Reply
  • Blanca

    But u just missed the beautiful bay islands, ROATAN a must in Honduras!!

    Reply
  • Doctora

    I’m a child psychiatrist and volunteer at Roatan’s Clinica Esperanza and Familias Saludables (AIDS program). Roatan is a wonderful place to visit. Contrarily, it’s a dangerous place to live — especially if you are poor and Honduran.

    Reply
  • Alis

    I am so happy to read that your stay in my country was memorable! Just like any country in the world, we have both good things and many areas of opportunity. However, there is a large amount of us who possess a strong desire to create a positive change that will impact the lives of everyone, especially of those who are less privileged. I am very proud of being a Honduran and I have hope that our country will change for the better. Next time you visit Honduras, don’t forget to try the “baleadas” – they are amazing!!!

    Reply
  • Nelly

    Honduras todo esta aquí!!!! Thanks for the nice comments in the article!’ Love that you enjoy your stay , you were in neat places , D & D , is great as lake of Yohoa is, Copan has IT own Mágic , The rain forest of pico bonito is astonish and el porvenir like all the small towns in Honduras have their something special like their people! Nevertheless , I see that you miss a lot more of nice spots , which is good cause it obligate you guys to come back and look for other new adventures, like have a good Minkey Lala at the paradisiac bay islands, rafting at cangrejal river in la ceiba, explore one of the best beaches in main land in Trujillo and visit there the fort of Santa Barbara and go back in time at the colonization era and the pirates histories , and what about to a visit at Valle de Angeles close to Tegucigalpa a little tipical town with a lot of small coffees , local stores and nice people, I know that there are much more places and other adventures missing in Honduras that obligates you to come back!!!’ Saludos amigos

    Reply
  • Cristiana

    Honduras is beautiful! thank you for visiting, you are always welcome to come back 🙂

    Reply
  • Marie J. Kawas

    You all also missed beautiful LA CEIBA, which is the city where Pico Bonito is… La Ceiba is one of the nicest place… It is the capital of hospitality. It has many eco systems, ocean, mountain, and also the coolness of the Cangrejal river surroundings, which is proper for water rafting…e.t.c. … La Ceiba will soon become the number one world destination.

    Reply
    • Gabriel

      You have spoken like a true Ceibena!!! U forgot to mention that La Ceiba is where the Baleada got perfected! BAM!!!! No Ghhhhaaaaarrrrrlllliiiiiiccccccccc needed!

      Reply
  • Roberto

    Dear Ash and Rich,
    First of all, I take my hat off to you for leaving everything behind and embarking on such amazing journey! I doubt many of us on this blog would have the huevos to do that 🙂

    I respect people who give of themselves and do volunteer work. I was born in Honduras and spent the first 20 years of my life there. I came to the US to pursue a higher education and have lived here another 20+ years. Ever since I can remember, foreign volunteers have been coming to Honduras to build schools and clinics, so thank you for your work! Please disregard the judgmental and bitter “white savior” comments. It’s pretty clear to me, based on the majority of comments posted here, that your honest and personal experience is very much appreciated by Hondurans and foreigners alike.

    I do have a question, what’s gonna to happen to “Little Red” when you finish your trip?!

    Enjoy Costa Rica. They’re also very friendly people and are probably still celebrating the success of their soccer team in the World Cup 🙂
    I look forward to reading your travel updates.
    Thank you and Godspeed!

    Reply
    • Rich and Ash

      Thank you for the comment Roberto!

      Our plan is to ship Little Red back home when we’re done. It’ll get a little TLC I’m sure, then it’ll be driven as an adventure mobile and farm truck (assuming we live on a farm by then!).

      Reply
  • Eleonora

    I’ve been in Honduras for one year as an exchange student. The best year of my life so far, made even better by all those amazing people I’ve met! And the food is just to die for (I miss so much baleadas and the fried fish from Yojoa – and do not even mention tamales and tajadas). It’s just a beautiful country that will conquer your heart!

    Reply
  • Leda Hernández

    As Neidi I did not like having read that Copan Ruins are “mediocre”. If you have some knowledge of the Maya Culture, you must be aware of the great role Copan played, for example, how precise the Mayan calendar was and much more. So, be careful about making statements about things you have no knowledge of.
    I don’t want to omit to thank you for putting the country in a positive light though, even if the problems the people are facing are far more deep than you can imagine.

    Reply
  • Pingback: Honduras: The Murder Capital of the World | Upload. Honduras

  • Antonio

    It was delightful to read about your experience in Honduras. It’s been almost six years since I last visited and I can’t wait to go back.

    Thank you for sharing your anecdote with us. Although many local people are caught between the cross fire of corruption and crime, the majority of Hondurans are kind, hard-working, and decent people.

    Reply
  • Joshara

    the thing about the Ruins is that Tikal is more like New York and Copán like Paris. The size of them doesn’t determine the quality.

    Reply
  • Edgardo

    if we may have problems with crime and unemployment, but as Hondurans we should be grateful for the beautiful country we have and instead of being negative and liabilities should start promoting a change in our society and culture, because we are Hondurans citizens to make the change and not rely on the government to do something, I am ashamed of how compatriots as “inti” can express so negatively mocking and comparing the description he makes of our land and people with Hollywood, Honduras is Beautiful and we should continue believing in a radical change for the peace of our people and a promising future, thousand thanks for visiting Honduras and see the positive in our land and affection of our people, Gracias Mil!!

    Reply
  • GracielaRodriguez

    Inti when was the last time you were in Honduras or in Los Angeles for that matter. I left Honduras right after high school way back then most of you were born. On a regular time I visited my beloved country. Traveled by bus, hitchiked, traveled with friends or my myself even when the Sandinistas and contras were abundant. Also every government, military or elected. And yet, I have always enjoyed the hospitality and friendliness of my home country people. And yes I am a dark skinned WOMAN. Regarding Los Angeles, USA it is not safe if you are white or dark.

    Reply
  • Gerardo

    Hi. I didnt read all of the post but let me tell you guys a little bit of what I know about my country. Yes the color skin, the language you speak and how You look really matters. Also My country has a lot of murders for many reasons: people are involved un bad things (gangs, soccer “fans clubs”, drug dealing, etc..), a lot of people driving like crazy on roads (specially truck drivers that think they own the road), and for refusing to cooperate when a thief (who doesnt even care about you he only wants money to feed himself or to pay for his drugs) by giving him what he wants even if thats only a cellphone or some earnings. My country is beautiful and the people are too…but let’s be honest you guys just went to the cool places…where rich people have control of and mostly nothing happens because it’s a tourist place and they try to keep it safe. If not, then outsiders would stop going there. Do you think most tourist go to the capital (that’s where I’m from) walk with their iphones and fancy cameras on the middle of the street like you would do in Canada or USA? Nop…that’s doesn’t happens a lot. Roatan is filled with drug dealers and people with money who make sure the island is safe cause it gives them more money. In my entire life in Honduras (22 years) I was robbed like 6 times in public transportation with guns, also walking in the streets. Its not easy…you can’t be wearing fancy things, carry expensive cellphones and taking them out if you are going to be walking on the streets. The truth is if you are a tourist every police officer will love you. Come on if you are traveling its because you have money. MONEY…if money wasn’t so valuable the government wouldn’t be so corrupt. GO to the fancy places in my country cause you’ll love them. And one recomendation if you really want to know about the murders. Turn the TV on and put channel 6 or 36…you can see the bodies of the dead, yes…you can even get a close up and different angles of it. Well I’m glad you like my country. I hope you go back and nothing happens to you…

    Reply
  • Joe Bodden

    I must say, this article is very insightful as to what you’re in for when visiting my home country. It is sad how the media can negatively impact such a beautiful place. My most beautiful childhood memories are of myself walking down the river, occasionally diving down in search of shrimps. The sad truth is, living there is different. The amount of violence and corruption due to the gangs and organized drug cartels is ridiculous. I’m not sure how or when this will ever change. Usually, the fish starts to stink from the head. I wish the best for my country and for all the people who live in it. This country has suffered enough with natural disasters and corrupt government officials. The times I’ve returned to visit, I’ve had a wonderful time but the things I’m told by family and friends are shocking. Regardless, where ever you go, go with God. Btw, thank you for volunteering.

    Reply
  • Abdul

    As with every country on the planet, there are two sides to Honduras as well as to many of the other countries in Central America. On the one hand, there is the natural beauty, the impressive ruins, the new and exotic foods, and the helpful locals that most tourist interact with. Then there is the poverty, crime, violence, and political unrest that are the everyday realities for the majority of local people.

    I really appreciate how in the introduction of your blog you acknowledge that what you were writing about was your experience in this country, and that you are not attempting to comment on challenges faced by everyday residents that you as tourist never would see. I think it is very nice to have someone give an account detailing their visit to Central America that that portrays these countries in a positive way.

    I have had the privilege of living and working in different countries in Central America for the past seven years. The vast majority of people that I have met as a foreigner(with dark skin) have been exceptionally kind, hard-working, honest people. Unfortunately their lives are surrounded by the sadness, stress, and frustration that comes from inadequate infrastructure, uncontrolled gang violence, political corruption, and religious dominance.

    Honduras definitely deserves its title as the second most dangerous country in the world, currently El Salvador is the first. Like many commentators have mentioned all a person needs to do is turn on the news here and see how every single day people have their lives snuffed out for little things. Hopefully the time will come where the majority of Honduran citizens can enjoy their country in the same way that visitors can. It is commendable that you are willing to volunteer in the way that you are. Please keep up the good work

    Reply
  • Alejandra

    It’s so great to hear that you enjoyed our country! Most of the time people have a stereotype about countries they haven’t been to. For example (and I might go out on a limb here and sound a little rude, but) people tend to think Dutch people smoke weed all day, or when you think about Colombia the first thought that comes to your mind is cocaine and drug lords. Most of the time that’s not all there is to a country, you know? And sadly, our stereotype just happens to be “you’ll get killed the moment you step foot in this country”, and quite honestly it’s not like that at all. I love how you’re both so open-minded that you decided to give my country a try! Props to you guys! I know you probably thought twice about coming, but I’m glad you did and got to see for yourselves how nice it is (or at least got a gilpse of it). Because let me tell you, you didn’t even go to the best places in here. If you ever want to go on vacation you HAVE TO come to Roatan. You can do parasailing, snorkeling, swim with the dolphins and lot’s of other fun things.. It’s paradise, I swear. It was ranked #3 in the Top 10 Islands of 2015 according to TripAdvisor and it was all over CNN, TIME, you name it. There’s also the Joya Grande Zoo, where you can do canopying and lots of other outdoorsy activities that I know you’re very fond of. But enough bragging about Honduras, this comment was intended to let you guys know I really appreciate the sincerity in this article. You said the Copan Ruins were pretty mediocre, guess what? I think they’re kind of mediocre too. What’s important is that you were honest and that means everything else you wrote is true! So if my advice was any good, I hope you guys come back and visit some new places in here soon! You’re welcome to come anytime you want 🙂 we’ll be waiting! And by the way, I loved the pictures! They’re gorgeous!!

    Reply
  • Issis Carrillo

    Thank you for that! I am an Hondurian young adult, andit nothing to be afraid of, if you want to enjoy a tropical weather and like hiking and long walks in tropical forest, for sure this is the right place!

    Reply
  • Jose Cruz

    It is sad to hear that our own press has destroyed the way people view our country. People imagine a horrible place to come and have fun. It is almost out of the picture for some of the foreigners because of what they listen on the media. It is true that many of the bad things that happens is because of the corruption and other like delinquency. I have lived here for 30 years and have never been assaulted or had a bad experience. As long as you are in safe places and you are not a gangster, there’s nothing to worry. People here are very helpful, and love to have foreigners. Honduras is definitely a place for foreigners to visit and enjoy of this Indigenous land. There’s more here than you can ever imagine. Come for a visit!

    https://www.airbnb.com.hn/rooms/152516

    Reply
  • Patty

    My question is….why did you come to our country if you already knew many bad information about Honduras? What I think is that you were not ready to come to Honduras and Central America….and even more you don’t have a open mind to accept differences between countries. In few words I don’t like your article….iit’s so nasty. You better stay at your country or next time read more and be open and nice.

    Reply
    • Jenny Woods

      Patty, please delete the comment you posted because it has nothing to do with this article. You should try reading it first before commenting because you just sound ridiculous. This guy has only posted good things about our country, despite the fact that it is known as The murder capital of the world.

      Reply
  • Jenny Woods

    That sounds amazing what you guys did. I’m glad tou found my country satisfying. Next time, you should try the Island I live kn called Roatan. It is the most beautiful and biggest island of Honduras and is very famous for its beaches, resorts, people, and tourism. It is a very peaceful island. 🙂 The only thing is that everything is a bit more expensive than the mainland since ly island lives on tourism. I assure you that you will NOT regret the experience.
    -Jenny Woods

    Reply
  • Dara Danz

    Your disclaimer at the top, should be sign enough for you to realize that NO, you do not have the necessary information to portray countries like mine and that by writing these articles, you are doing a disservice to a country whose condition is ignored at the international level. Indeed, you can’t comment on political issues, poverty, and the way of life of the millions of people you didn’t meet. You are MERELY describing your great three week experience in a country that you knew almost nothing about before you crossed the border and after you left. The sensationalist title is misleading and made to attract reader, which brought me here. Whether intentional or not, you are pretending that all of the great things you list about Honduras cancel out its sad story. So please, before you go on easily in your future posts about your travels, think of the way this affects others, ESPECIALLY those whose countries you are portraying.

    Articles like this are something that makes my blood boil when I hear the stories of tourists in Central America and in countries where the majority of people live under inhumane conditions.
    To make things clear, let’s get some things straight about Honduras:
    Violence has escalated greatly in the last decade. Honduras indeed has the highest murder rate in the world. Violent crime has forced people to flee Honduras by the thousands.
    There are 57 physicians per 100,000 people. Fifty seven, and that is actually inflated.
    To the disfavor of those who cannot afford it, Honduran schools are increasingly becoming private businesses. Public education receives minimal support and the average Honduran student will not have access to safe, consistent, well rounded education. This is reflected in the constant strikes that public educators often go on because the government does not value education and does not provide the resources necessary to educate a people who have been held submissive for hundreds of years.

    You are speaking about your experience as white, North American, English-speaking tourists. The average Honduran citizen WILL NOT read this post, largely because literacy rates in Honduras are lower than most sources will show and because they do not have access to computers, nor the internet and because they have other graver worries in their life. Note that the comments here are all in English. Those speaking in laud of your article, inviting more tourists to come, claiming that Honduras is a safe place as long as you stay in the safe places, are most likely privileged people who can guard themselves from rampant corruption, poverty, inequality, abuse from police and the military. And those of us who have opened our eyes and who have experienced the type of abuse that happens in countries like mine on a daily basis, are hesitant to accept your very skewed perspective.

    You post so nonchalantly that you paid $2.50 for your meals and for your boat, yet make no mention that $2.50 are around 55 Lempiras. 55 Lempiras buys you close to nothing nowadays in Honduras. Do you think that paying that little for your food is a sign of a good thing? Think again. The people who raise the food you eat, most likely received close to nothing for the bulk of their work. People in Honduras are not paid with livable wages.

    It is obvious to me, that even after your stay you still know almost nothing about Honduras.
    Honduras IS a beautiful place. We know this. We are aware of the beauty of our country, it is no secret to us. What is problematic is that people are more concerned about the portrayal of a country because they are concerned that the public image is not good enough to attract tourism yet have no interest in educating others about the terrible conditions under which people in Honduras live. Fear is a daily affront in Honduras. Crime in Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula, the largest cities in the country, has escalated to unlivable conditions for hundreds of thousands of Honduran citizens. Political instability has also escalated.

    Read the news, learn about people, EDUCATE yourselves and then, and only then, feel comfortable enough with providing your experience.

    Reply
  • William

    Hi, I’m William and I’m Honduran. Honduras is not a bad country, and I’m not saying this because of my nationality, im saying it because it is. Yes i know, and every honduran knows, that the press here makes the country a bad reputation worldwide, but if they didn’t did that, all the newspaper and tv news chanels would probably broke LOL, Honduras has nice cultural history and legacy. A recommendation if you’re interested to come here is to make stops in Copan, Bay Islands, Comayagua, Valle de Angeles, Santa Lucia, Amapala, Lago Yojoa, Ceiba… and those are just some of the places. If you get to come to Honduras, don’t think of it as a risky trip, think of it as a probability to know oner of the worlds most unknown countries

    Reply
  • belkis

    Oh everybody is welcome home, we are wealthy people, we have our own problems as a society, but don´t forget this…..MY HOUSE IS YOUR HOUSE, and we you are here, you are safe!!

    Reply
  • Alexis Morazan

    I’m a Honduran that travels thru Honduras and I’m in love with this country. If any of you travellers going thru Tegucigalpa, shoot me an e-mail, there are many cool places to see here.

    Reply
  • Gabriel

    “Stupid is as stupid does” Well my Canadian friends, you have done well. I noticed the policemen that you and your wife had taken with. Just notice “the baby” strapped on that officer [both of them] and also notice what is near the hand of that officer … it is normally referred to as “the trigger finger” and those guys, believe me, will not hesitate using it when necessary – questions asked later. It is that way out of necessity. Plus and Minus nothing. That is all. I have buried loved ones and friends in Honduras, unnecessary deaths, and that is not different from anywhere else in the world. You will notice in many areas of the country that the standard weapon every policeman has is an automatic weapon without exception. The reality demands they do. Which is why one must use common sense where one goes and at what time and with who. So now that that has been stated, thank you for your positive article, it does everyone who has visited and also lives in Honduras good. Ah, do not think much about the “the white man thing”, my dad was caucasian and my mother olive brown “trigena oliva”. Short version: Mestizos – I am part french/spanish/indian. What can I say? That does not matter. What does matter is that you got to taste some awesome food [man, that fried fish at Yojoa!!!]. I have not had fried beans like the Honduran fried beans anywhere in the world. The fish and coconut dishes on the Northern seaboard are just exceptional [Roatan is an Island, Utila is also an Island and both are part of the Bay Islands rim], Beautiful indeed! In the southern pacific seaboard there is the best shrimp and lobster!!!. Siguatepeque is a small town/municipality between Tegucigalpa [the capital city] and Lake Yojoa, it is very interesting and by the road side there is some food to contend with – the best Honduran coffee I have ever tasted I tasted in Siguatepeque. So, there is still a plethora of places that you could not possibly have seen that are wonderful. You cannot cover as much when your only form of transportation is your vehicle. Honduras is a beautiful country, just be more informed – culturally and politically. Right now there is a tremendous effort on the current government administration to bring social conscience to the good things that communities across the nation can achieve; this is being done with media promotion and personal visits from representatives who many a time bring the goods with themselves. So it is neat to see that. Another aspect that you did not mention: Music. Honduras has some original interesting music as well as it being rich in salsa, merengue, cumbia, rhumba, bachata, and ballads. There, you have more homework to do for your next visit. Wish you well and Godspeed.

    Reply
  • Jessica

    Thank you for your post. Thank you for loving our country. Sorry about the comments from some rude people ( they are rude to everybody, they believe this is the way to help our country, sorry). The majority appreciate your kind words and the volunteering you are doing in our country. Be blessed in your journeys.

    Reply

Leave a comment